The Bear

$ 20.00

Funds raised in Barrett's honor will be paid to Family Reach to cover healthcare associated expenses for patients in need by directly paying the owed vendor. i.e. hospital, bank, etc. on behalf of the patient. To learn more about the breakdown of proceeds, please see our pricing transparency.

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Made in North Carolina less than an hour from his alma mater, Wake Forest University, The Bear is a bit more athletic than the average dress sock, sporting arch support with cushioned toes and heels. They’re perfect for hitting the trail after a long day at the office.

Sock Sales of $20

$4 to production

Average cost to produce, fulfill, and process payment.

$8 to patients

The campaign organizer uses proceeds for medical expenses or donates to a health-focused charity.

$8 to Resilience Gives

Resilience Gives reinvests proceeds to compensate staff, keep the lights on, and reach patient communities.

Direct Donation of $100

$3 to payment provider

Our payment provider captures 3% on all transactions.

$97 to patients

The campaign organizer uses proceeds for medical expenses or donates to a health-focused charity.

All available sizes will ship within 48 hours of purchase.

The Bear was inspired by Barrett’s love for the outdoors, hiking, and traveling. 

Barrett Nichols

Barrett Nichols graduated from Wake Forest University in 2011 and now works in operations for Delta Air Lines in Atlanta. Bear, as his friends call him, and his wife Lauren enjoy traveling together - in the almost five years they have been married they’ve gone to Thailand, France, Chile, and more! Bear also enjoys hiking, golf, the Atlanta Falcons, and cheering on Wake Forest sports teams.

Barrett was diagnosed with a rare hybrid of AL and AM leukemia in March 2017. He had been sick with the flu and pneumonia leading up to his diagnosis. When the pneumonia struggled to improve with antibiotics, his doctor did blood work that showed evidence of leukemia, so he was advised to go to the hospital. Before Bear was able to start chemo, the first challenge was to get rid of the pneumonia infection that was dragging down his immune system.

His treatment at Emory University Hospital includes six rounds of chemotherapy followed by a bone marrow transplant. During the first rounds of treatment Lauren often spent the night in the hospital to take care of and be with Bear. His parents, brothers, friends, and coworkers have been huge sources of support as well.